Recent Tweets
  • Leadership is about creating just enough narrative, practice, and container for patterns to be practiced at scale.
  • On a distinction between "Difference In," and "Indifference" and ice cream -- for times of conflict:
Receive Blog Posts by Email


Photos

Dunbar’s Number

An interesting email from my friend Toke Moeller in Denmark. From this premise, I wonder if this number is changing with increased connection through social networks. I wonder if the size of the neocortex is growing / evolving because of this multi-layered level of connection, once sci-fi, that has now become a norm.

Dunbar’s Number

Dunbar’s number is suggested to be a theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person.[1] Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. No precise value has been proposed for Dunbar’s number. It has been proposed to lie between 100 and 230, with a commonly used value of 150.[2] Dunbar’s number states the number of people one knows and keeps social contact with, and it does not include the number of people known personally with a ceased social relationship, nor people just generally known with a lack of persistent social relationship, a number which might be much higher and likely depends on long-term memory size.

Dunbar’s number was first proposed by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who theorized that “this limit is a direct function of relative neocortex size, and that this in turn limits group size … the limit imposed by neocortical processing capacity is simply on the number of individuals with whom a stable inter-personal relationship can be maintained.” On the periphery, the number also includes past colleagues such as high school friends with whom a person would want to reacquaint oneself if they met again.[3]

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

20 − fifteen =

Receive my Posts by Email